Curriculum Overview

 

Key Stage 3 Key Stage 4 Sixth Form

Term 1: Organisms: Movement and Cells

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated because of equipment and facility requirements. In this unit, students are introduced to cells. They will explore and develop their understanding of animal and plant cells, cell specialisation, cell division and organ systems. Students will also have the opportunity to develop microscopy skills, slide preparation and scientific drawing.

There will be an end of topic assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Antagonistic
A biological structure or chemical agent that interferes with the physiological action of another.

Muscle
A band or bundle of fibrous tissue in a human or animal body that has the ability to contract, producing movement in or maintaining the position of parts of the body.

Nucleus
A dense organelle present in most eukaryotic cells, typically a single rounded structure bounded by a double membrane, containing the genetic material.

Mitochondria
An organelle found in large numbers in most cells, in which the biochemical processes of respiration and energy production occur. It has a double membrane, the inner part being folded inwards to form layers (cristae).

Cell Membrane
The semipermeable membrane surrounding the cytoplasm of a cell.

Cytoplasm
The material or protoplasm within a living cell, excluding the nucleus.

Vacuole
A space or vesicle within the cytoplasm of a cell, enclosed by a membrane and typically containing fluid.

Chloroplast
A plastid in green plant cells which contains chlorophyll and in which photosynthesis takes place.

Microscope
An optical instrument used for viewing very small objects, such as mineral samples or animal or plant cells, typically magnified several hundred times.

Specialised
Specialised cells. Cells may be specialised for a particular function. Their structure will allow them to carry this function out.

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Term 1: Matter: Particle Model and Separating Techniques

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. An introduction to the three states of matter and the particle model. Students will be asked to apply this to a number of scientific concepts e.g. diffusion, density pressure and dissolving/solutions. Students will then look at mixtures and the purity of substances (melting and boiling points).

There is an end of topic assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Solid
A solid is a sample of matter that retains its shape and density when not confined. The adjective solid describes the state, or condition, of matter having this property. The atom s or molecule s of matter in the solid state are generally compressed as ti

Liquid
A liquid is a sample of matter that conforms to the shape of a container in which it is held, and which acquires a defined surface in the presence of gravity.

Gas
A gas is a sample of matter that conforms to the shape of a container in which it is held and acquires a uniform density inside the container, even in the presence of gravity and regardless of the amount of substance in the container.

Energy
Power derived from the utilisation of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines.

Collision
An instance of one moving object or person striking violently against another.

Dissolve
(with reference to a solid) Become or cause to become incorporated into a liquid so as to form a solution.

Saturate
To cause (a substance) to unite with the greatest possible amount of another substance, through solution, chemical combination, or the like; to charge to the utmost, as with magnetism.

Solution
A liquid mixture in which the minor component (the solute) is uniformly distributed within the major component (the solvent).

Solute
The minor component in a solution, dissolved in the solvent.

Solvent
Able to dissolve other substances.

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Term 2: Earth: Structure and The Universe

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. Students will look closely at what makes up our planet. They will be asked to show an understanding of the chemical and geological processes that have shaped Earth over time. In addition, the topic covers the study of the universe and the stars.

There will be an end of topic assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Continent
Any of the world's main continuous expanses of land (Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America, Australia, Antarctica).

Mantle
Mantle: is the part of the earth between the core and the the crust is the MANTLE. It is about 1,800 miles(2,900 km) thick and makes up nearly 80 percent of the Earth's total volume. The mantle is made up of magma and rock.

Convection
The movement caused within a fluid by the tendency of hotter and therefore less dense material to rise, and colder, denser material to sink under the influence of gravity, which consequently results in transfer of heat.

Layers
A sheet, quantity, or thickness of material, typically one of several, covering a surface or body.

Tectonic
Tectonics is concerned with the processes which control the structure and properties of the Earth's crust, and its evolution through time.

Heliocentric
Having or representing the sun as the centre, as in the accepted astronomical model of the solar system.

Telescope
An optical instrument designed to make distant objects appear nearer, containing an arrangement of lenses, or of curved mirrors and lenses, by which rays of light are collected and focused and the resulting image magnified.

Radiation
The emission of energy as electromagnetic waves or as moving subatomic particles, especially high-energy particles which cause ionization.

Planet
A celestial body moving in an elliptical orbit round a star.

Satellite
An artificial body placed in orbit round the earth or another planet in order to collect information or for communication; a celestial body orbiting the earth or another planet.

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Term 2: Reactions: Metals, Non metals, Acids and Alkalis

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. An introduction to the properties of metals before considering the principles of reactivity series and displacement reactions. Students will then look at reactions between acids and alkalis including real life applications.

There will be an end of topic assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Metal
A solid material which is typically hard, shiny, malleable, fusible, and ductile, with good electrical and thermal conductivity (e.g. iron, gold, silver, and aluminium, and alloys such as steel).

Acid
A substance with particular chemical properties including turning litmus red, neutralising alkalis, and dissolving some metals; typically, a corrosive or sour-tasting liquid of this kind.

Alkali
A compound with particular chemical properties including turning litmus blue and neutralising or effervescing with acids; typically, a caustic or corrosive substance of this kind such as lime or soda.

Reactivity
Reactivity is the tendency of a substance to undergo chemical reaction, either by itself or with other materials, and to release energy.

Hazard
A danger or risk.

Risk
A situation involving exposure to danger.

Corrosive
Corrosives are materials that can attack and chemically destroy exposed body tissues. Corrosives can also damage or even destroy metal. They begin to cause damage as soon as they touch the skin, eyes, respiratory tract, digestive tract, or the metal. They

Indicator
In chemistry, an indicator is defined as a substance that undergoes distinct observable change when the conditions of its solution change. Litmus is the most commonly used indicator in the laboratory.

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Term 3: Genes: Variation and Human Reproduction

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. Looking at the science behind human reproduction, from fertilisation through to birth and beyond. Students will learn the anatomical structure of the reproductive system.

There will be an end of topic assessment.

Gene
A distinct sequence of nucleotides forming part of a chromosome, the order of which determines the order of monomers in a polypeptide or nucleic acid molecule which a cell (or virus) may synthesize.

DNA
Deoxyribonucleic acid, a self-replicating material which is present in nearly all living organisms as the main constituent of chromosomes. It is the carrier of genetic information.

Fertilisation
The action or process of fertilizing an egg or a female animal or plant, involving the fusion of male and female gametes to form a zygote.

Nucleus
A dense organelle present in most eukaryotic cells, typically a single rounded structure bounded by a double membrane, containing the genetic material.

Inherit
Derive (a quality, characteristic, or predisposition) genetically from one's parents or ancestors.

Variation
Variation, in biology, any difference between cells, individual organisms, or groups of organisms of any species caused either by genetic differences (genotypic variation) or by the effect of environmental factors on the expression of the genetic potentia

Environmental
Relating to the natural world and the impact of human activity on its condition.

Reproduction
The production of offspring by a sexual or asexual process.

Sexual
Connected to sexual activity.

Asexual
(of reproduction) Not involving the fusion of gametes.

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Term 3: Consolidation of Prior Learning

New Description

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Term 4: Energy: Costs and Transfers

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. The unit explores the relationship between kinetic energy and electrical energy and its application in generating energy for the home.

There will be an end of topic assessment.

Kinetic
Relating to or resulting from motion.

Thermal
Relating to heat.

Electrical
Concerned with, operating by, or producing electricity.

Transform
Make a marked change in the form, nature, or appearance of.

Nuclear
Several neutrons are also released which can go on to split other nearby atoms, producing a nuclear chain reaction of sustained energy release.

Light
Light energy is the only form of energy that we can actually see directly. It is formed through chemical, radiation, and mechanical means. Light energy can also be converted into other forms of energy.

Sound
Vibrations that travel through the air or another medium and can be heard when they reach a person's or animal's ear.

Gravitational Potential
When an object is above the Earth's surface it has gravitational potential energy (GPE). The amount of GPE an object has depends on its mass and its height above the Earth's surface. The weight of an object is the size of the force of gravity pulling the

Elastic Potential
Elastic potential energy is Potential energy stored as a result of deformation of an elastic object, such as the stretching of a spring. It is equal to the work done to stretch the spring, which depends upon the spring constant k as well as the distance s

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Term 4: Waves: Light and Sound

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. This topic introduces the movement of energy in the form of sound. In addition the topic will also introduce basic properties of light and covers concepts such as reflection and refraction.

There will be an end of topic assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Energy
Power derived from the utilisation of physical or chemical resources, especially to provide light and heat or to work machines.

Vibrations
Vibration is a mechanical phenomenon whereby oscillations occur about an equilibrium point.

Waves
Waves involve the transport of energy without the transport of matter. In conclusion, a wave can be described as a disturbance that travels through a medium, transporting energy from one location (its source) to another location without transporting matte

Particles
A particle is a minute fragment or quantity of matter. In the physical sciences, a particle is a small localized object to which can be ascribed several physical or chemical properties such as volume or mass.

Transverse
Situated or extending across something.

Longitudinal
Running lengthwise rather than across.

Reflect
(of a surface or body) Throw back (heat, light, or sound) without absorbing it.

Refract
(of water, air, or glass) Make (a ray of light) change direction when it enters at an angle.

Disperse
To spread across or move away over a large area, or to make something do this.

Spectrum
Used to classify something in terms of its position on a scale between two extreme points.

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Term 5: Forces: Gravity and Contact Forces

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. This topic will include speed, velocity and pressure. Students will then be asked to apply this knowledge to real life examples such as speeding cars.

There will be an end of topic assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Gravitational
Movement towards or attraction to something.

Force
Strength or energy as an attribute of physical action or movement.

Newtons
The SI unit of force. It is equal to the force that would give a mass of one kilogram an acceleration of one metre per second per second, and is equivalent to 100,000 dynes.

Acceleration
Increase in speed or rate.

Attract
To draw by a physical force causing or tending to cause to approach, adhere, or unite; pull (opposed to repel ): The gravitational force of the earth attracts smaller bodies to it.

Mass
A large body of matter with no definite shape.

Contact
When two objects or things meet.

Friction
Friction is the resistance to motion of one object moving relative to another. It is not a fundamental force, like gravity or electromagnetism. Instead, scientists believe it is the result of the electromagnetic attraction between charged particles in two

Thermal
Thermal science is the combined study of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and combustion.

Pressure
The force per unit area that one region of a gas, liquid, or solid exerts on another. Pressure is usually measured in Pascal units, atmospheres, or pounds per square inch. A substance is said to have negative pressure if some other substance exerts more f

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Term 5: Ecosystems: Interdependence and Plant Reproduction

Please note that each 'duo' of topics will take place in the relevant half term but may be rotated and therefore not in strict order because of equipment and facility requirements. This topic explores how organisms at different feeding levels interact and feed with a focus on plant organs and plant reproduction to ensure population survival.

There will be an end of term topic using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

Pollination
Pollination is the act of transferring pollen grains from the male anther of a flower to the female stigma. The goal of every living organism, including plants, is to create offspring for the next generation. One of the ways that plants can produce offspr

Fertilisation
The action or process of fertilizing an egg or a female animal or plant, involving the fusion of male and female gametes to form a zygote.

Germination
Germination is the process by which a plant grows from a seed. The most common example of germination is the sprouting of a seedling from a seed of an angiosperm or gymnosperm. In addition, the growth of a sporeling from a spore, such as the spores of hyp

Reproduction
The production of offspring by a sexual or asexual process.

Insect
A small arthropod animal that has six legs and generally one or two pairs of wings.

Stigma
The stigma receives pollen and it is on the stigma that the pollen grain germinates. Often sticky, the stigma is adapted in various ways to catch and trap pollen with various hairs, flaps, or sculpturings.

Style
For flowering plants, style takes on a whole new meaning. In plants, the style is a structure found within the flower. It is a long, slender stalk that connects the stigma and the ovary. The stigma is at the top of the style and is a sticky platform where

Anther
The part of a stamen that contains the pollen.

Filament
A slender thread-like object or fibre, especially one found in animal or plant structures.

Stamen
The male fertilizing organ of a flower, typically consisting of a pollen-containing anther and a filament.

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Term 6: Revision

Students will apply key scientific approaches to solve a murder mystery. The unit looks at key analytical techniques required during a forensic investigation. A scientific project will take place following this.

There will be an end of year assessment using past exam questions to be completed under exam conditions and assessed by the teacher.

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Term 6: Revision and Catch Up

This term we will use the results of assessments throughout the year to consolidate areas of underperformance

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